Videos of the 2007 5th Meeting

«Our guests speak about Greece and their experiences»

 

 


THE FULL TALKS of the 5th CRITICAL CARE & EMERGENCY MEDICINE MEETING of the GREEK ARMED FORCES MEDICAL CORPS


"The septic patient and the patient with trauma: Newest Data"

Click on a topic to watch the video. Press on the video, while watching, to enter fullscreen

 

Brief Introduction

 

Septic Shock: Current definition and new guidelines in adults

 

Successful treatment of the septic patient without CVP, PA catheter or CO monitoring - what is really important?

 

Lung ultrasound in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

 

Tight insulin control: Newer recommendations

 

Ultrasound assessment of alveolar recruitment

 

Common pitfalls in sepsis

 

The role of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner in the ICU

 

Critical Incident Stress Management, lessons learned from September 11th 2001 and the  Tsunami in December 2004

 

Alteration of the microcirculation in the critically ill patient

 

Sleep alterations in the ICU patients and personnel

 

Update on sepsis molecular mechanisms and novel therapies

 

Genetic predisposition, PIRO and biomarkers: Predicting risk of sepsis

 

Are we communicating? The role of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner in ensuring effective communication in critical care

 

What have we learnt from the last 5000 trauma patients in our ICU?

 

Promoting Early Identification of Patient Compromise with the use of a Rapid Response System

 

New approach to the acid-base balance of the septic patient

 

Surviving sepsis guidelines: Our personal experience and our suggestions for improvement in the Greek ICUs

 

Early goal directed therapy

 

An alternative approach to the concepts of health, disease and host response

 

Targeting sepsis through infection prevention measures

 

The role of the cranial Doppler in the acute management of the brain injury patient

 

Decompressive craniectomy in traumatic brain injury - a controversial mixed blessing

 

Bosnia, Kosovo and Afghanistan: Lessons learned from the front